Humectants: Panthenol – a closer look

If you’ve read this blog for any length of time, you’ll know I’m a fan of panthenol and use it in many different products. We see it a lot in hair care products, but I think it has a place in skin care products, especially those for dry or wounded skin. Allow me to share…...

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Humectants: Questions, questions, questions!

In this post about humectants, there have been quite a few comments I thought I would share with you, my wonderful readers! And since I’m currently planning a series on creating products for dry skin that relies heavily on the usage of humectants, this seems like a great way to start a series on those...

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Question: Does glycerin draw water from your skin when the humidity is low? (updated)

I’m still on a quest to figure out the answer to this question…so let’s review information I’ve found so far. What is a humectant? “Humectancy or hygroscopy is the tendency of a substance to attract water from the surroundings by absorption and adsorption at defined conditions (temperature, humidity).” (page 26, this review). Is glycerin a...

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Humectants: A lotion maker’s best friend or moisture thief?

I’ve always thought of February 27, 2009, as the official birthday of the blog as this is when I decided to blog every single day about some kind of bath or body thing, be it an ingredient, a recipe, or a fun fact to know and learn. One of the earlier posts was entitled Humecants are...

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Humectants: Dipropylene glycol & butylene glycol

Dipropylene glycol shares many of the characteristics of propylene glycol, but it has a higher boiling point (232.2˚C vs. 188˚C for propylene glycol) and a higher molecular weight. It’s used more as a fragrance fixative than a humectant, although it can behave as a hygroscopic ingredient. It will reduce the freezing point of your products...

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